Do’s and Don’ts for Creating Your Own Team Activity

Some team activities are very simple in concept, and you might think “I can do that.” It’s fun and fulfilling to design “games.” So if you are considering creating an event for your company meeting, here are some helpful hints that we have learned in our 24 years of experience.

Do’s

  1. Know the people who will be participating, and plan an activity that would appeal to them. For instance, a young, active group would not be as interested in a sedentary activity as something more active and possibly outdoors. Also, some events appeal more to men than women (paintball is a good example) and vice versa. Consider what people like and what they are good at.
  2. Plan your activity to be no longer than about 3 hours. Something shorter is fine, but there have been some people who think an all-day scavenger hunt is fine. Your participants will be tired and ready to do something else after 2.5-3 hours.
  3. Keep it fun and engaging. You’ll lose momentum if people have to wait around “for a turn.” Try to design your event so that everyone can and must participate. That is what a team is about.
  4. Err on the side of being simple rather than too complex. Sometimes people who design events think “oh, everyone knows that ,” when in fact they don’t. For example, one of our clients wanted to create some improve scenarios for her group. She wanted people to converse using only famous lines from movies. Many people are not movie buffs. Additionally, when you put too many clever twists into an event, you must ask yourself whether or not you think your group can solve the clue or deal with the change. They must have some degree of success, or people get discouraged and your event takes a negative turn. When in doubt, test your game on a small group of friends or business associates.
  5. Run through every possible pitfall and create a failsafe for each one. For example, if you provide written instructions, make sure they are clear. If any part of your instructions can be interpreted in a way that is not what you are trying to communicate, rewrite it so it is clearer. Then, post helpers in key spots to make sure the participants are going in the right direction.
  6. Make sure everyone celebrates in the end. You want them all to leave on a high, energetic note.

Don’ts

  1. If you have created a puzzle or clue for people to figure out as part of your game, do not get freaked out if they don’t get it immediately. Part of teamwork is learning to solve problems together. Give them some time to work on it. If they don’t get it within a reasonable period, then give them clues. Don’t do it for them. That just makes it look like you don’t think they have the ability to figure it out—and it takes the fun and joy out of solving it together.
  2. Don’t change the rules midstream –especially if other facilitators are giving instructions too. This only confuses people and it makes you and your assistants look disorganized.
  3. Don’t take it too seriously. What keeps people engaged is when an activity is fun, interesting and entertaining.
  4. Fail to plan. Know what is supposed to happen at every part of the activity. It helps to write down a timeline (what are people doing when). For example, if the event requires people to build something—after two hours, where should they be in their construction? Nearly done?
  5. Fail to give yourself enough time before the event. Most team activities require some set-up. Make sure you provide enough time to easily bring in and set-up materials needed. If you have to post clues or post people in various locations, make sure you have more than enough time to do so—and that everyone is in the spot they are supposed to be in.
  6. Prizes. Everyone likes to win something. Even if it is a simple token like a gold medal. Bring prizes!

Lastly, if you have a good idea and what some help turning it into a great event, call us. We create custom activities for our clients all the time. We can take an Indiana Jones theme and weave a fun activity into those dry breakout session. This can enhance learning speed, make boring content memorable and the meeting a lot more enjoyable.

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